The True Measure of a Teacher

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Photo: Ted Ajibe via Getty Images

"In a country where most kids don’t finish school, one man took it upon himself to teach those who are left behind."

If you are a teacher, you owe it to yourself to read this article from HuffPostImpact. If you are a student who values learning, you owe it to yourself to read this article.

As teachers, we all know, that when it comes to judging our suitability to teach, we are often judged by our credentials. But students know that caring is the one credential that matters the most. Mohammed Ayub is a fireman in Islamabad, Pakistan. After working all day in his formal job, he teaches an informal school, helping students deprived of formal schooling learn to read, write, and prepare for government exams. Mr. Ayub is a teacher who cares, and the students who rely on his teaching are much the better for it.
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Books at the Boundaries of the World

blogEntryTopperI’ve always been a big reader. I read everything I could get my hands on … sports, history, fiction, non-fiction. I usually had three or four books going at once. They sparked my curiosity, blazed new paths of learning, and painted a world of wondrous opportunity. Maybe that’s what resonated with me when I saw a great piece on Worldreader, a non-profit focused on putting books in the hands of students in distant reaches of the globe.
Read on, Macduff…
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Bigger Brainiac: Bugs Bunny or Willy Wonka?

blogEntryTopperIn the never-ending debate of who might be the smartest fictional character (no such debate, I just made it up), I’ve always been partial to Bugs Bunny. It’s hard to bet against him when you watch how easily he manipulates Elmer Fudd and tools Daffy Duck (granted, not the sharpest tools in the shed, but they’re no Wily Coyote, either).

New research on chocolate and cognitive function suggests there may be a new player in the game, though … the whimsical Willy Wonka, owner of his own chocolate factory.

On a serious note, there is solid research suggesting that cognition can be affected by nutrition. Read on, Macduff…
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Of Drunks, Lampposts, and P-values

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When it comes to discussion, data rules, right? If it's data, then it has to be fact. And if it is a fact, it has to be accepted. End of discussion!

I've never really been comfortable with that position. My discomfort principally revolves around two concerns. First, are we really sure about these so-called facts? And, secondly, have we critically examined the facts, or are we using the facts more, as they say, for support than illumination?

I have always loved that quip about facts and illumination. QuoteInvestigator attributes the earliest version of the allegory of drunks and lampposts to A. E. Housmann's critique of his colleagues' scholarship: Read on, Macduff…
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